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Food fight

Food fight

Hot Pockets and Easy Mac will no longer be available for sale in the student store due to a new district policy. After a meeting between the school principals and the Director of Child Nutrition, the district has outlawed selling food at the student stores.
“The cafeteria wasn’t gaining any money,” senior class Vice President Natalee Dueber said. “The food wasn’t very good [at the cafeteria], so the students started going to the student store for food.”
The district believes that food sales have shifted away from the cafeteria to the student store due to the different types of food offered in the latter.
“The cafeterias in the district have gone in the hole half a million dollars,” student store manager Nancy McKinney said. “[The district] feels like they can stop our sales and [as a result] increase theirs.”
A portion of the revenue goes toward ASB and other student organizations such as the sports, band and club programs, while another part is allocated towards the student store and its staff.
“Basically they’re taking away from us $25,000 a year,” McKinney said.
The student store is not permitted to sell food during nutrition break and lunch, but only during the small window of time before and after school. Colina Middle School has also been affected as of two Fridays ago.
“ASB members are quite upset because they feel that their choices are being taken away from them,” ASB adviser Toni Young said.
ASB’s student leaders have been discussing possible solutions to make up for lost funds, which include hosting fundraisers and encouraging students to purchase merchandise from the student store.
“Our President, Laura Sylvers, wanted to go and give a presentation as to why this whole thing shouldn’t happen,” Dueber said, “but for now, we’re going to try to up the revenue to counteract the funds we’re losing.”
This issue will be discussed during the site council meeting that will be held this month.
“We’re going to see a decrease in profit, but we need to have more conversations with the students, the administration and the district,” Young said, “so maybe we can find a way that all sides can benefit.”

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