The Lancer

The Lancer

The Lancer

TOHS Theatre Flies Among the Stars
TOHS Theatre Flies Among the Stars
Gemma Spraggins, Assistant News Editor • November 21, 2023

With opening night of “Peter and the Starcatcher” on Thursday, November 16th, and closing night on Saturday, November 18th, the cast has...

Boston Journalism Convention goes in all the ‘write’ ways
Boston Journalism Convention goes in all the ‘write’ ways
Aandrea Pineda-Dominguez, News Editor • November 6, 2023

With a stinging chill in the air, professional writers and aspiring journalists gathered in Boston, MA for the annual JEA/NSPA Fall National...

Should schools have a block schedule?
Maximus Cover and Christian-Isaiah Aguilar November 3, 2023

Fall Sports Round-Up
November 3, 2023

No red flags for Girls Flag Football
No red flags for Girls Flag Football
Lilah Swaving and Riley Brown October 28, 2023

Former Thousand Oaks High School varsity head football coach Mike Leibin took on a new yet somewhat familiar challenge: TO girls flag football...

Lancers tie for Canyon League title
Lancers tie for Canyon League title
Jackson Kurtz, The Lancer Staff • October 28, 2023

Q&A THE LANCER: What challenges did you have to overcome in your first season?” MCENROE: “Every job is unique and there’s no such...

Lakers Preview: Title No. 18?
Lakers Preview: Title No. 18?
Jake Bradley, Sports Editor • October 28, 2023

With LeBron James entering his 21st season in the NBA, he only has his eyes on winning his fifth championship and, for the Lakers, their...

AROUND T.O.WN
Rhiannon Hendershot, The Lancer Staff • October 28, 2023

Reign of Terror 275 N Moorpark Rd East, Thousand Oaks, Sept. 29-Nov. 4, 7 p.m.-11 p.m. Walk through various bone-chilling rooms and exhibits...

Preserving the human aspect in the age of AI
Preserving the human aspect in the age of AI
Joseph Goodnight, Opinion Editor • October 28, 2023

With the ever-changing scope of technology, we as a generation constantly have to accept new ways in which artificial intelligence is integrating...

Día de los Muertos Dance strives for increased inclusivity
Día de los Muertos Dance strives for increased inclusivity
Kimberly Jerez, The Lancer Staff • October 28, 2023

The Latino Connection Club at Thousand Oaks, Newbury Park and Westlake High have come together to host their annual Día de los Muertos dance,...

OFF-CAMPUS PASS
Momo Sonoda, Editor-In-Chief • October 28, 2023

Unanimous GOP vote elects Rep. Mike Johnson for House Speaker More than three weeks after the historical outsting of the Speaker of the House,...

Cheers, Starbucks: a new staple in TO
Cheers, Starbucks: a new staple in TO
Kailah Spencer, The Lancer Staff • October 28, 2023

“Can I get a Lancer Frappuccino?” was something Starbucks manager Miguel Medina heard a lot of following the opening of the new store...

TO welcomes college visitors
Alyssa Kiszczak, Managing Editor • October 28, 2023

Throughout the year, TO provides students with college visits from many schools across the nation. They usually consist of an informational briefing...

Orchestra starting the year off on a good note
Orchestra starting the year off on a good note
Aandrea Pineda-Dominguez, News Editor • October 28, 2023

The instruments are finely tuning, patience is running out, and the maestro is preparing to orchestrate another musical masterpiece. Thousand...

Science Rooms gets a Facelift
Gemma Spraggins, Assistant News Editor • October 28, 2023

On the first day of the school year, TO forensics teacher Michael Flores watched his class experience science in a whole new way. As...

Día de los Muertos Dance strives for increased inclusivity

D%C3%ADa+de+los+Muertos+Dance+strives+for+increased+inclusivity

The Latino Connection Club at Thousand Oaks, Newbury Park and Westlake High have come together to host their annual Día de los Muertos dance, and this year, they are hoping to make it more inclusive to other hispanic countries by hosting the Baile de la Catrina dance.
La Catrina has a much more universal message, since not every hispanic country celebrates Día de los Muertos. “La Catrina” is an image commonly associated with Día de los Muertos: A tall, female skeleton who wears a hat with feathers and a long, beautiful dress. She symbolizes the cycle of life and to appreciate it, but to also embrace death.
This dance is an event for the hispanic community and others to come together and recognize the culture, and going to these dances can make people feel connected and give them an opportunity to meet new friends. It also gives them a chance to have a community and to feel included with them.
“Going and helping at these dances helped me get in touch with my roots more,” senior Gio Aguirre said.
In order to find out what food they planned to sell — in addition to the ticket prices, the theme and decorations — the clubs set up multiple meetings to collaborate and make sure that everything runs smoothly. For decorations, they chose to highlight the flower cempasúchil, or marigold, which is important to Día de los Muertos because it is believed that when a path is formed with the petals, it will guide the ancestors to their families and make sure they won’t get lost. Event planners also selected decorations such as papel picado and even an altar. Attendees also tasted foods including esquites and chicharrones de harina.
Formed more than 30 years ago by TO wrestling coach Manny Valdez, the Latino Connection Club shines a light on the growing hispanic community at TOHS. It is now run by club presidents Gio Aguirre and Helen Reveres.
“I joined the club freshman year and when I got back sophomore year, joining felt like I had a community, I felt like I belonged,” Reveres said. “It was eye-opening and I felt more comfortable and had more pride for my culture.”
When joining, people can expect a safe environment and community, with events that include field trips to colleges and meetings with guest speakers. Some of these speakers were zoologists, city council members, past alumnus, and people from the school district.
These experiences give the members knowledge about job opportunities and what they can do with their life after high school, while connecting them to their past.

Story continues below advertisement
More to Discover
About the Contributor
Kimberly Jerez, The Lancer Staff